Nordic Solutions to Global Challenges

Nordic Solutions to Global Challenges

”There is group of countries which have done remarkably well in the face of the challenges to our modern, democratic societies… Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden might just hold the clues to solving the security, social, political, environmental and technological threats and challenges of the 21st Century”.

– These are the words of Project Director András Simonyi in the foreword to a book of essays, “Nordic Ways”.

Nordic Solutions to Global Challenges is a joint initiative by the Prime ministers of the Nordic countries. We want to invite the world to share Nordic knowledge and experiences of six priority flagship projects. These Nordic solutions will be effective tools in our common work to reach the United Nations Sustainability Goals before the year 2030.


This information comes from the website of www.norden.org (Nordic Solutions to Global Challenges).


Article from Norden.org: 10 facts about the Nordic Region and Nordic co-operation


The Explorer is a digital marketplace for green technology from Norway.


Low-carbon success stories to inspire

Low-carbon success stories to inspire

Proven low-carbon solutions available for countries to choose from. See the solutions here.

The Finnish Innovation Fund Sitra has teamed up in 2016 with the Nordic Council of Ministers and distinguished institutions from all the Nordic countries to answer a simple question: how far could we go simply by scaling up already proven Nordic low-carbon solutions? The Green to Scale project has combined innovative analysis with active communication.

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15 Nordic solutions can cut 4 gigatons of global emissions

15 Nordic solutions can cut 4 gigatons of global emissions

By scaling up just 15 proven Nordic solutions, countries all over the world can save 4 Gt of emissions every year by 2030 which is as much as the EU produces today. The costs for this scale-up equal the amount spent in just 9 days on fossil fuel subsidies.

These results come from the Nordic Green to Scale study which was launched during the UN Climate Conference in Marrakech.

Check out all the 15 solutions here.

The Finnish Innovation Fund Sitra has partnered with the Nordic Council of Ministers and distinguished institutions from all Nordic countries to answer a simple question: how far could we go simply by scaling up existing Nordic low-carbon solutions to a level of adoption in 2030 that has already been achieved by one or more Nordic countries today…


Read the whole article by Christian Bjørnæs in CICERO.

This is why Finland has the best schools

This is why Finland has the best schools

The Harvard education professor Howard Gardner once advised Americans, “Learn from Finland, which has the most effective schools and which does just about the opposite of what we are doing in the United States.”

Following his recommendation, I enrolled my seven-year-old son in a primary school in Joensuu. Finland, which is about as far east as you can go in the European Union before you hit the guard towers of the Russian border.

OK, I wasn’t just blindly following Gardner – I had a position as a lecturer at the University of Eastern Finland for a semester. But the point is that, for five months, my wife, my son and I experienced a stunningly stress-free, and stunningly good, school system. Finland has a history of producing the highest global test scores in the Western world, as well as a trophy case full of other recent No. 1 global rankings, including most literate nation.

In Finland, children don’t receive formal academic training until the age of seven. Until then, many are in day care and learn through play, songs, games and conversation. Most children walk or bike to school, even the youngest. School hours are short and homework is generally light.


Read the rest of the article by William Doyle in The Sydney Morning Herald.


Here is another article about the schools in Finland:
11 Ways Finland’s Education System Shows Us that “Less is More”.


Michael Moore exerpt:
 

 
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