Ocean Clean Up

Ocean Clean Up

At The Ocean Cleanup, we’re developing the first feasible method to clean up world’s ocean garbage patches. Five vast areas of Open Ocean, known as the subtropical gyres, act as a trap for ocean plastic. We specifically focus on the North Pacific accumulation zone – also known as ‘the Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ – since about 1/3 of all oceanic plastic is concentrated in that one area between Hawaii and California 1.

When I founded The Ocean Cleanup almost three years ago, there was no realistic way to clean up these accumulation zones, each several million square kilometres in size. I realised that coastlines are evidently very effective in catching plastic. Unfortunately, there is no landmass in the middle of these gyres, so I then proposed to deploy a very long array of floating barriers attached to the seabed. This would act as an artificial coastline, allowing the ocean to clean itself. We aim to deploy our first pilot system in 2016, and hope to be able to start cleaning the North Pacific by 2020.

Yet a common argument against our efforts is that focus should instead be on preventing more plastic from entering the oceans. I fully agree prevention is top priority. Having to clean up the gyres again a few decades after cleaning up would be nothing short of annoying. But in my opinion, one does not exclude the other – they complement each other.

First of all, the ocean garbage patches do not go away by themselves and hence need to be cleaned up at some point in time.


This information comes from the website of The Ocean Clean up.

Read the whole article here.

SeaOrbiter – a oceanic station

SeaOrbiter – a oceanic station

SeaOrbiter is the only vessel in the world allowing a 24/7 exploration on long-term missions of the open sea and the abyss.

An exploration vessel and a universal scientific laboratory dedicated to the discovery of the underwater world and the education around sustainable development applied to the ocean.

Multiple scientific missions and a large education plan. SeaOrbiter is the only one- of- its- kind scientific and educative platform, complementary to existing observation and analytical tools of the oceanic world.

The missions conducted from the vessel will enable to better understand the links between ocean and atmosphere, the planktonic balance, the decrease of marine biodiversity or the impact of climate change upon the marine world and its wealth of life.

SeaOrbiter will allow discovering and valorizing new marine richness which will, tomorrow, enable the development of major innovations in various fields such as nutrition, health, biotechnologies or renewable marine energies. SeaOrbiter is also a powerful education tool dedicated to the marine world and engaging all generations.


This information comes from the website of SeaOrbiter.

The Seabin Project

The Seabin Project

The Seabin is an automated rubbish bin that catches floating rubbish, oil, fuel and detergents.

It designed for floating docks in the water of marinas, private pontoons, inland waterways, residential lakes, harbours, water ways, ports and yacht clubs.

Can even be fitted to super yachts and motor yachts!

What are the goals for the Seabin Project?

  • To help rid the oceans of plastics and pollution.
  • To have a Seabin production in place by mid to end of 2016 and start shipping.
  • To create Seabins from the most sustainable materials and processes available.
  • To have the lowest carbon footprint possible in the production of the Seabins by means of alternative materials and processes. Also by reducing shipping and having the Seabins manufactured in the countries of installation.
  • To create and support local economies with the production, maintenance and installation of the Seabins world wide.
  • To have future models of Seabins for specific locations.
  • To educate people and cultures about being more responsible with the use and disposal of plastics.
  • To setup educational programs for students in schools.
  • To convert our captured plastics into energy.
  • To reuse or recycle our Seabins for other uses and or applications.
  • To have pollution free oceans with no need for the Seabins.

This information comes from the website of The Seabin Project.