Extinction and the Revolution of Love

Extinction and the Revolution of Love

By Charles Eisenstein

excerpt:

Why would we want to serve life? Unlike self-preservation, that desire can only come from love.

Let let us consider one more dimension of extinction. Above I posed a scenario in which nature dies while humanity survives. To even state this, though, implies the separability of humanity and nature. In fact, we are inseparable; we are nature’s expression. Therefore, we cannot actually be “just fine” when the rest of life is dying. It is not necessarily that we cannot survive as the rest die. It is that with each extinction, with every ecosystem and place and species that passes, something of ourselves dies as well. With the shriveling of our relations, we become less whole. We might continue to progress in GDP, in miles traveled, in years lived, in floor space and AC units per capita, in educational attainment, in total consumption, in terabytes, petabytes, and exabytes, yet these endlessly swelling quantities will only mask and distract from a ravening spiritual hunger for all the things they have displaced: connection and belonging, a familiar birdsong that is a little different each time, the smell of spring, the swelling of the buds, the taste of a sun-drenched raspberry, the grandfathers telling stories of a place that the children know well too. With each step into an isolation chamber of our own making, so sharpens our suffering. We see already the symptoms of extinction in ourselves, in rising rates of depression, anxiety, suicide, addiction, self-harm, domestic violence, and other forms of misery that no amount of material wealth can assuage.

In other words, the depletion of life on earth accompanies a depletion of our souls. As we destroy beings, we destroy our own beingness. No longer enmeshed in a web of intimate, mutual relationships, no longer participating in life around us, surrounded by contained, dead things, we become less alive ourselves. We become zombies, wondering why we feel so dead inside. This is the ultimate source of the protests. We yearn to recover life. We want to overturn the Age of Separation.


Read the whole article by Charles Eisenstein in https://charleseisenstein.org.


Planet Warriors: People are repairing the world!

Planet Warriors: People are repairing the world!

This video took almost 1,000 days to make.

It was filmed in more than 10 countries. And it’s all about one topic.
I hope you enjoy watching this as much as I enjoyed making it.

About Nas:
My name is Nas. It means people in Arabic. I make 1-minute videos about myself and others. Everyday. I wear the same t-shirt, and I have a company. That’s it!
https://nasdaily.com/

Nas on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/nasdaily

Do Plants Respond to Pain?

Do Plants Respond to Pain?

After watching this short video from Amazing Plants, you have to wonder – do plants feel pain?

If you want more information about plants you can watch the documentary – The Secret Life of Plants based on the book with the same title. Even on the lower levels of life, there is a profound consciousness or awareness that bonds all things together. Published in 1973, The Secret Life of Plants was written by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird.
http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-secret-life-of-plants/
 

The Slideshow That Saved The World

The Slideshow That Saved The World

An Oral History of An Inconvenient Truth

Al Gore got stuck on a scissor lift. Studio execs fell asleep at a screening. And everybody hated the title. The amazing true story of the most improbable — and important — film of our time.

A decade ago, climate change was a huge problem with a small audience. Unless you were among a handful of brave policymakers, concerned scientists, or loyal Grist readers, it’s fair to say the threat of a rapidly warming world took a back seat to High School Musical, MySpace, and whether or not Pluto was a planet (yes, those were all a thing in 2006).

Then, An Inconvenient Truth happened.

Somehow, a film starring a failed presidential candidate and his traveling slideshow triggered a seismic shift in public understanding of climate change. It won Oscars and helped earn Al Gore a share of the Nobel Peace Prize. It injected the issue into policy debates and dinner-table conversations alike.

Did any of this actually “save the world?” OK, you got us. Ten years after the movie’s release, climate change is still a growing threat and a polarizing issue, with record-breaking heat unable to stop skeptics from tossing snowballs on the Senate floor. But we’re also seeing corporate, political, and societal mobilization against the crisis on a scale that would have been hard to imagine 10 years ago, and there’s no question the film played a big part in getting us there…


Interviews by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, Amelia Urry, Eve Andrews, and Melissa Cronin.

Read the whole article in grist.org.

The ‘Best Day of My Life’ music video

The ‘Best Day of My Life’ music video

The oil company Shell just released this music video. Seven sustainable energy innovations also appear in the video.

The ‘Best Day of My Life’ music video, featuring the combined talents of Jennifer Hudson, Steve Aoki, Pixie Lott, Luan Santana, Yemi Alade and Tan WeiWei.

It celebrates the power of collaboration to #makethefuture and showcases the bright energy ideas to emerge from Shell’s collaboration with young energy entrepreneurs.


For more information read an article about this video in Adweek here.

 

Conservation Intern. presents NATURE IS SPEAKING

Conservation Intern. presents NATURE IS SPEAKING

Nature Is Speaking is Conservation International’s invitation to the human race to listen to nature.

Nature is essential to every aspect of human life and well-being — we want to make sure it’s included in the conversation. People are taking more from nature than it has to give, and as a result, we’re putting our own lives on the line.

Nature’s message to humanity is simple: Nature doesn’t need people. People need nature.


For more videos of this kind shown below visit Conservation International and their page Nature is speaking.